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Apr 262017
 

As great as Wolverine is, it’s actually nice to give someone else from the X-Men franchise a turn to have his own movie for a change. He’s a superhero mutant called Deadpool.

To be honest, I never heard of Deadpool before seeing this movie. It turns out that he’s a former Special Forces operative named Wade Wilson (Ryan Reynolds). Wade is indestructible and has a huge sense of humor. And I often thought Spiderman was the funniest superhero.

As it turns out, Deadpool was also featured on X-Men Origins: Wolverine. Ryan Reynolds played the role then as the sword-wielding soldier Wade Wilson. However, when he was featured as a mutant, Wade was a lot different. He didn’t have the red suit, or go by the name Deadpool. So there’s no way I would’ve recognized him then.

Back to this movie, Deadpool is a smooth fighter and likes to make jokes, mostly dirty ones. As disturbing as his origin story is, he still can’t help but make wisecracks toward his enemies, Ajax (Ed Skrein) and his superhuman associate Angel Dust (Gina Carano).

There are only two other X-Men featured. The first is Colossus (voice of Stefan Kapcic). He was a favorite of mine since he was a playable character on the X-Men Arcade Game. I can still remember how loud the laughter in the movie theater was when Deadpool tried to fight him.

The other X-Men member featured was Negasonic Teenage Warhead (Brianna Hildebrand). I never heard of this mutant before, but her power is amazing. She can actually blow things up, like a warhead.

And of course, let’s not forget the Stan Lee cameo. It’s nice to see him make these appearances in each Marvel movie.

Things get real exciting when Ajax captures Wade’s girlfriend Vanessa (Morena Baccarin) and Deadpool goes to save her with the aid of the two X-Men, respectively. If only Deadpool wouldn’t keep forgetting his ammo bag.

This was certainly an interesting superhero movie. However, it’s hard to tell if Deadpool is actually a superhero since he keeps claiming that he’s not. So does that make him an antihero, or what?

Apr 192017
 

Old school horror star Vincent Price has done it again with yet another classic, Theater of Blood. In this feature, Vincent Price stars as Edward Lionheart, a Shakespearean actor that was humiliated at an awards ceremony after being passed over for an award to an actor whom he felt didn’t deserve to win.

Lionheart decides to take revenge on a group of critics by murdering them one by one, based on the murder scenes of various Shakespeare plays, like getting stabbed to death from Julius Caesar, or drowning in wine from Richard the Third, etc. It’s very creative since Lionheart also dresses in different disguises and recites passages from the Shakespeare plays as he kills each of the critics.

Of course, such a task cannot be done alone. Lionheart ends up finding beggars and drug addicts in the streets that help him out. Why they agreed to help is anyone’s guess.

Inspector Boot (Milo O’Shea) leads the investigation behind the murders. Even with head critic Devlin (Ian Hendry) knowing the pattern and who is responsible, Boot finds it hard to believe since Lionheart committed suicide long ago, or did he.

Inspector Boot’s main suspect is Lionheart’s daughter Edwina (Diana Rigg). However, she doesn’t believe her father is still alive either. You’d think Edwina would be off the hook, but Boot refuses to think that she wasn’t somehow involved. This only adds to the mystery.

This was a good horror film, especially with the level of horror being campy, which made it more interesting. However, some of the murders were a bit too gruesome to watch. Most particularly the one where pie is stuffed down a critic’s throat from Titus Andronicus. Aside from that, I’ve got to hand it to Theater of Blood for providing a great amount of knowledge about Shakespeare, which makes for a helpful source for those unfamiliar with his many plays.

Apr 122017
 

If you thought Sailor Moon was a cool anime series, then I have no doubt that you’ll find Glitter Force (2015-2016) just as interesting. This Netflix original series is about five middle school girls who gain superpowers from Glitter Charms and protect the world from the evil Emperor Nogo and his forces.

The heroes are the optimistic but clumsy leader Emily as Glitter Lucky, the tough jokester Kelsey as Glitter Sunny, the shy artist Lily as Glitter Peace, the loyal athlete April as Glitter Spring, and the highly intelligent Chloe as Glitter Breeze. Together these five friends are the Glitter Force. The team members are introduced one at a time per episode but at least that’s not spread too far apart like some shows do, like Sailor Moon and Sgt. Frog for example.

Of course every superhero team should have a guide. The guide for the Glitter Force is Candy, a pixie from the magical kingdom of Jubiland. She’s cute and hyperactive, especially when it comes to her ears being styled like hair buns.

I met Debi Derryberry, the voice of Candy, at Anime Festival Orlando 2013.

There’s also Candy’s older brother Pop. He’s not featured as frequently, which is too bad since he’s more vigilant than Candy and can transform into different things.

I met Todd Haberkorn, the voice of Pop, at MegaCon 2012.

Now we get to the villains. Hailing from the Shadow Realm, four fairytale based creatures use their power to absorb negative energy from innocent bystanders in order to revive Emperor Nogo. The first is Ulric the wolf who is very cunning and based on the Big Bad Wolf.

Brute is a troll that prefers to use brute strength over intelligence. Of course trolls are very common in both fairytales and the fantasy genre.

Third is a wicked witch named Brooha that uses magical contraptions and can clone herself easily. She’s based on different fairytale witches.

Then we have Rascal the jester. Despite his annoying voice, he’s pretty creative. He fights with magical playing cards and has a playful, but sadistic persona. He wasn’t featured in the series very much but I like his style, for a villain.

When the villains decide to attack and gather negative energy, only one of them goes to Earth at a time. Then he/she creates a monster out of a random object called a Buffoon, which always has a giant body and a clown face. Whenever the Glitter Force defeats it, a Glitter Charm appears and gets added to their arsenal.

Image result for glitter force

This was an interesting series for its superhero action that’s on the level of Power Rangers. At the end of each episode, there’s a song and dance number by the Glitter Force. The songs are pretty good and they only change after four episodes. If you are a Sailor Moon fan, I would suggest giving this show a try.

Apr 052017
 

The LEGO features just keep on coming. In LEGO DC Comics Super Heroes: Justice League vs. Bizarro League, Superman meets up with Bizarro. Now I never really understood who Bizarro was before when I saw him on Superman the Animated Series. It turns out that he’s a clone that thinks backwards.

In this version he’s not such a bad guy. Since Bizarro is so backwards, he ends up harming the citizens of Metropolis when he means to help them. As a solution, Superman sends Bizarro to a backward planet that’s uninhabited. However, Superman was creative by naming the planet Bizarro World and using the many radioactive rocks to build citizens and left Bizarro to build homes for them.

Next we get to a more exciting scene. The Justice League battles Giganta, Gorilla Grodd, the Penguin, Deathstroke, and Captain Cold. As great as it is to see these characters, they don’t return once they’re caught and I find that a bit disappointing.

Of course the real focus is on Bizarro when he returns to Metropolis and creates clones from Justice League members Batman, Wonder Woman, Green Lantern, and Cyborg. They are just as backwards as Bizarro and go by the names Batzarro, Bizarra, Greenzarro, and Cyzarro.

It turns out that there’s trouble in Bizarro World, so the Justice League and their clones go there and discover that Darkseid is stealing the radioactive rocks to power a weapon to take over the galaxy.

I met Tony Todd, the voice of Darkseid, at Vulcan Events 2010.

When the Justice League arrives, their powers are affected. Wonder Woman is clumsy, Cyborg falls apart, Batman’s gadgets don’t work, and Green Lantern can only make chickens. At least it’s better than Greenzarro’s teddy bears.

Oddly, Superman isn’t affected and frankly neither is Darkseid. Could it be because they’re not Earthlings?
Darkseid’s first stop is Earth. Luckily, it’s protected by other Justice League members like Hawkman, the Flash, Green Arrow, and Plastic Man. It’s nice to see these characters also.

This was an interesting LEGO feature, but like in the previous one (Lego Batman: The Movie – DC Super heroes Unite) Batman doesn’t trust Superman. It’s so annoying how the issue just drags on while hearing Batman’s thoughts throughout.

Mar 292017
 

Before starring in the various Edgar Allan Poe based movies, Vincent Price has starred in many other horror features. One such film was the original version of House of Wax (1953). Unlike the House of Wax remake about college teens in the woods, this movie takes place in 1890s New York. Professor Henry Jarrod (Vincent Price) is a talented wax figure sculptor that specializes in historical figures like John Wilkes Booth, Joan of Arc, Marie Antoinette, and Marc Antony for his museum. Jarrod also talks to them like they were real people.

Although Jarrod prefers the beauty and artistic integrity, his business partner Matthew Burke (Roy Roberts) is more focused on the profits and demands more sensational exhibits. Jarrod provides an opportunity for an art critic, Sidney Wallace (Paul Cavanagh), to buy Burke out, but Burke decides to burn the museum down to claim the insurance money. What a shame, those were such nice wax figures destroyed by corruption.

Shortly after, a cloaked and disfigured killer is on the loose killing people and even stealing their bodies. The killer looks a lot like Jarrod, but is it really him? That leaves some mystery.

Apparently, Jarrod did survive the fire, but his hands are disfigured and he’s confined to a wheelchair. He reopens his museum but focuses on historical crimes and recent murders, though it seems out of character. The part that stands out most is when Jarrod provides smelling salts for the women who pass out during the tour. That’s so funny.

Here’s something interesting. This movie has an intermission in the middle. In the old days they had those, even when the movies were on home video. No movies have had that in years and that’s a good thing since it’s so annoying.

House of Wax was also in 3-D, but the only 3-D moment I could find here was when a greeter (Reggie Rymal) uses his paddleballs while announcing the exhibits in the museum out front to get customers to come inside.

Jarrod also reveals that he uses models to create the faces of his wax figures like the face of recent murder victim Cathy Gray (Carolyn Jones). I liked her perky persona.

The only one that’s suspicious is Cathy’s friend Sue Allen (Phyllis Kirk). Part of it could include how the killer keeps coming after her, or maybe it’s something more, despite Jarrod’s thorough explanations about how the art is done.

This was a good movie. Sometimes it’s nice to look back on the original version of a movie after seeing the remake, though I must point out that the two versions are hardly alike at all. Which do you prefer?